Can you use radox muscle soak when pregnant?

A BEAUTY therapist is warning pregnant women to avoid using a popular brand of bath soap because it contains ingredients that could trigger early labour. Hayley Wright claims Radox muscle soak contains an essential oil called clary sage, which is believed to increase childbirth hormone oxytocin in the body.

Why is Radox muscle soak bad for pregnant women? A BEAUTY therapist is warning pregnant women to avoid using a popular brand of bath soap because it contains ingredients that could trigger early labour. Hayley Wright claims Radox muscle soak contains an essential oil called clary sage, which is believed to increase childbirth hormone oxytocin in the body.

Is the clary sage in Radox Bath safe for pregnant women? The Office for Product Safety and Standards told us there’s no evidence that clary sage would be dangerous for pregnant women in the quantities found in bath products. A viral post claiming a Radox bath product contains a potentially labour-inducing ingredient—without any appropriate warning labels—has been shared around 112,000 times on Facebook.

What kind of sage is in Radox muscle soak? One of the ingredients of the Radox Muscle Soak is Salvia sclarea oil—otherwise known as clary sage. It is this ingredient that the Facebook user was referring to. The Office for Product Safety and Standards told us “There is no evidence that clary sage would be dangerous for pregnant women in the quantities found in bath products.”

What kind of oil is in Radox muscle soak? Hayley Wright claims Radox muscle soak contains an essential oil called clary sage, which is believed to increase childbirth hormone oxytocin in the body. But the products makers, Unilever, insist the bath soak is safe for use and is “thoroughly assessed to ensure they meet our high quality and safety standards” before being sold.

Is it safe to use Radox bath products during pregnancy?

Is it safe to use Radox bath products during pregnancy? A Radox bath product contains the ingredient clary sage which can induce labour in pregnant women and should never be used during pregnancy, especially in the first and second trimester.

Are there any problems with the Radox muscle soak? One of the bigger problems that customers have with the Radox Muscle Soak is that it turns their bathwater unnaturally blue. It can be a little uncomfortable stepping into bright blue water when it comes time to relax. In the opinion of reviewers, there was no need to add the extra chemical to dye the Radox Muscle Soak this color of blue.

What kind of sage is in Radox muscle soak? One of the ingredients of the Radox Muscle Soak is Salvia sclarea oil—otherwise known as clary sage. It is this ingredient that the Facebook user was referring to. The Office for Product Safety and Standards told us “There is no evidence that clary sage would be dangerous for pregnant women in the quantities found in bath products.”

Is it safe to use clary sage in Radox? We also spoke to Unilever—which owns the Radox brand—it told us “Our Radox Muscle Soak With Sage & Sea Minerals is completely safe to use and the very low quantity of clary sage present in the product does not lead to any adverse effects.